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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
seas caused by the current fiscal environment. yesterday in boston, the nation began to pay tribute and final respects to those killed in last week's senseless violence. the collective hearts of our coast guard family go out to the people of boston and all the families that have been harmed by this tragedy. but they also go out because the coast guard is a part of that community in boston, and we were able to respond immediately with boats and cruise and armed helicopter, vessel boarding teams and overall enhancement of maritime transportation security posture. our ability to respond like this, not only in boston, but in all our ports, is a direct result of the support that we've received from the congress and the administration over the last 12 years. the results of that support were also demonstrated during hurricane sandy when we rescued 14 crewmembers from the sailing ship h.m.s. bounty in 30-foot seas and 60 knot winds 80 miles offshore. we're also part of the community in new york and new jersey, so we were pleased to be able to get the port running again after the storm and w
the policy environment the so conducive to dealing with the key issues between the u.s. and mexico. the immigration bill is hot and heavy, front and center. marco rubio did ginsburg in espagnole. he had five sunday shows, to talk about immigration. the gang of eight is hard at work on that. guns, u.s.-mexico relations. outink the guns may come not quite as favorable to mexico's longstanding positions as the immigration debate might. i would take a 14 two. we will be in good shape. the third is trade. mexico, the united states, now japan, canada, are linked in the trans-pacific partnership talks. talks with many of our key trading allies across the pacific. many of us view it as a chance to help bring nafta into the 21st century. the three are very much on the u.s. agenda. it shows great forward progress. welcome all of you to what promises to be a truly fascinating session. be second reason this will terrific is because of our panelists. i will say little bit more about the ambassador of mexico. doris meissner, who i served with in the clinton administration. she is one of our grea
there are that can do no wrong. so what qualifies as a company that can do no wrong in this environment? a couple of things. first, a company makes something with declining raw costs that it charges more for than it used to, and people have to pay that higher price because they have no alternative. and that's pretty much everything that sells at a supermarket or drugstore these days. think about it. what's the raw cost of a drug? virtually nothing. and what can they charge? virtually anything, as we see pretty much nightly these days on "mad money" when we have these execs on that talk about the huge prices they're charging. do you think celgene can't raise the price of revlimid, its breakthrough cancer drug? are you worried regeneron can't raise the price of eylea, an injectable medicine that can make you see again and requires fewer shots in the eye than the competition? i'm not that concerned. how about the toiletries? let's take head & shoulders, the terrific shampoo, not the terrifying chart pattern. the plastic bottle costs less than it used to because of the low price of natural gas courte
for a few hours and to institute special targeting rules both in the air environment and at the canadian border environment in case there were those seeking to escape the scene. with respect to fema, i can, when saw the response in boston and a coordinated it was, even given the level of destruction, i would remind the committee that just last november, boston held a massive exercise on how to deal with a mass casualty event. and that exercise was the kind of exercise and exercise is supported by the committee through fema to local areas, and again increasing our ability for response and resilience. we have worked with the fbi and ietotate lct ross e critical infrarurs d oprators, and we've been reaching out to faith-based organizations, community organizations and others who want to know what they can do. we are implementing a number of security measures, both seen and unseen at airports, transit hubs within the maritime environment, and at ports of entry. the coast guard is provided security on the ferries in the boston area. viper teams are doing searches on terms of ground transporta
of the larger faith community. >> the political environment is a lot different than in 2007 the last time congress took up an effort to overhaul the nation's immigration laws. right now we have evangelical leaders who have signed on and said, look, there's a religious imperative to embrace the stranger and to reach out and help people who are in our community. on the republican side, you have what they call a coalition of bibles, badges and business. you have faith leaders. you also have law enforcement leaders, attorney general from the states. and other sheriffs. and business leaders who are saying, look, our system is broken. its time to fix the system. on the republican side they're getting pressure from some of these core constituents to come up with a solution. >> ifill: is it fair to say after seeing his kind of tour de force on the sunday talk shows yesterday that senator marco rubio, the florida republican, is the face of this? or are there other... is there other agitation going on especially over in the house? >> marco rubio is seen as essential to presenting this bill to conse
is looking for right now. remember, the stocks that are consistently working this environment belong to companies that benefit from moderating commodity costs and can continue to raise or at least maintain prices on their customers. meanwhile, the company is doing very well. kimberly-clark just reported on friday and delivered a 3 cent earnings beat on $1.33 basis courtesy of solid organic sales, terrific growth and improving margins. plus the company also raises guidance for the full year and on top of that, kimberly-clark pays a healthy dividend which yields, and they have been a serial increase. can this stock keep outperforming like it's been doing despite the fact that many analysts don't think it can? let's talk to tom faulk chairman and ceo to hear more about the quarter and what comes next. mr. faulk, welcome to "mad money." >> boo-yah, jim. how is it going? >> going really well. thank you, tom. great to have you on the show. >> jim, let me tell you. your set has never looked better. you've got the finest products in the world there. and we hope you love the "mad money" kleen
the business rules fixed for this environment, and we think that this will be sufficient in 14. >> other questions for the record. that last question was something that i know you and i have talked about, how to maximize delivery to the veterans in tough locations, rural locations we will see one coming in a thank you for that effort. >> thank you, mr. chairman. i apologize for being late. i have been following some of the testimony. want to thank your for your service. mr. secretary, particularly for your active duty service to our nation. now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing the resources available to our veterans in a very difficult time fiscally. let me begin with the senators area of inquiry relating to the electronic of record. i had understood that you described what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. >> we're talking about clam's year, completing the claims. >> the electronic record. >> the electronic health record complete certified. >> let me talk. the electronic health record system is still g
had -- they may not have had ieds but certainly have had high stress environments that kind of mimic a conflict. i'm thinking here about parts of the inner city or what is known as the inner city, cities like -- places like compton detroit, chicago a couple of years has been off the charts, parts of d.c. back in the '80s, parts of new york. so i mean -- i think there are high stress environments that mimic conflict zones. however, again i think this was different because this was -- we ignore what happens within our inner cities, within our urban centers and then in a way we ignore what happens in other people's cities and other people's foreign centers where we are active. and i think this was one moment that was broadcast all over -- all across the nation. it was all across the world. people were watching. all of a sudden, middle class americans, people who live in places like watertown they get a taste of what other countries -- what other people, what other parts of their own country have to go through. i don't think that it's crazy to -- the vocabulary that was used was the same
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
't replace the wild west environment with a legal situation. >> let me ask another question. techis that the highest end. i'm thinking of a rhode island business that has a high technical level of accomplishment. they don't have a colossal hr department. they work in a particular niche, when they can identify the person they need as the person they need, there may be the person with a skill set like that anywhere to be found. if you need a specific profile in dover, does this give you the capability to reach outnd recrthat person? the concern i ve heard from these businesses ieven iyou have heard from this person and start recruiting them, it creates so much uncertainty and delay and havoc that if they have an international capability, they will go wherever -- to germany, india or china. are you comfortable we can compete with those kind of people where there is a specific person you are looking for? >> i think the bill seeks a number of important steps. is of the points you hit on just by going to brown, the ph going to a hospital. help, ashe numbers long as we avoidniend consequen
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)